Maple Sugar

Jun 26
thechrishaley:

thechrishaley:

For real!
Help me and a great cause out with this!
Reblog!
Retweet!
Come watch us play!
twitch.tv/cooptonauts
You can donate as little as $5!
Also, if you’re a comic professional (or anyone else) and would like to donate some art or books or whatever, get in touch with me!
If we, as a culture, can raise over $67,000 for a Robocop statue, we can all throw a few bucks in to help this hospital that saves kids’ lives and NEVER sends their families a bill.

Why aren’t you reblogging this?!
IT’S TO HELP SICK KIDS!!

I guess helping sick kids is okay.

thechrishaley:

thechrishaley:

For real!

Help me and a great cause out with this!

Reblog!

Retweet!

Come watch us play!

twitch.tv/cooptonauts

You can donate as little as $5!

Also, if you’re a comic professional (or anyone else) and would like to donate some art or books or whatever, get in touch with me!

If we, as a culture, can raise over $67,000 for a Robocop statue, we can all throw a few bucks in to help this hospital that saves kids’ lives and NEVER sends their families a bill.

Why aren’t you reblogging this?!

IT’S TO HELP SICK KIDS!!

I guess helping sick kids is okay.

Jun 24

Stephanie McMahon, Triple H announce 'Connor's Cure' charity fund in honor of Connor Michalek →

newageamazon:

YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES! YES!

The WWE is often embarrassingly backwards in its social politics, but sometimes they do something that is truly kind and inspiring.

Jun 23

Podcast! The Comics, Episode 124 – The Inaugural Kieron Gillen Poetry Slam 2014 →

kierongillen:

Comics The Blog are some of my favourite people to chat to, so this interview - abstractly about WicDiv - basically wanders over the whole of pop culture in a casual way. Was a fun one to do, y’know?

Also features me reciting Philip Larkin poetry.

Man! 

The feeling is mutual, Kieron!

 It’s always a pleasure to talk about basically anything someone wants to, even if it’s not the reason they’re theoretically there.  I think this is one of our better interviews, and Special K being so charmingly and effusively not-from-here certainly helps smooth my rougher edges, too.

Jun 16
baseballcardvandals:

We lost a legend today. Such a badass hitter:
In 323 at-bats against Tom Glavine, John Smoltz, Pedro Martinez and Greg Maddux, Tony Gwynn struck out a total of 3 times. 

The guy Ted Williams and Greg Maddux couldn’t compliment effusively enough. 

baseballcardvandals:

We lost a legend today. Such a badass hitter:

In 323 at-bats against Tom Glavine, John Smoltz, Pedro Martinez and Greg Maddux, Tony Gwynn struck out a total of 3 times.

The guy Ted Williams and Greg Maddux couldn’t compliment effusively enough. 

Jun 13

ericafailsatlife:

Guys. I’m an adult.

<3

Apr 29

chrishaley:

"Criminals are a cowardly, superstitious lot, I tell you what."

Here I have drawn HANK HILL as BATMAN (‘66)!

You can buy the original art (which I’ve included a picture of) in my Etsy shop!

BUT WAIT! IT GETS BETTER!

In celebration of Free Comic Book Day being this weekend, if you buy anything from my Etsy shop between today and the end of the weekend (4/29 - 5/5/2014), I’ll also draw you a FREE SKETCH of any comic character you like!

Can’t beat free, right?

So, I’ve got a bunch of original art and 21 prints done up all fancy like for sale in my Etsy shop!

These are super-nice prints and I’m selling them:
1 for $10
2 for $15
3 for $20 (See how they get cheaper the more you buy?)

This was a lot of fun when I did it last year, so, obviously, I’d like to do even more free sketches this year, so your reblogs and retweets are very, very appreciated.

Hopefully, everyone will take me up on this, and we can all have fun watching me lose my mind under the work load as I post pictures of them all as I work on them!

TL;DR: FREE SKETCH WITH ANY PURCHASE FROM MY ETSY SHOP IN HONOR OF FREE COMIC BOOK DAY!

THE LINK TO MY ETSY ONCE AGAIN

My best to you all, and have a happy Free Comic Book Day!

xo
ch

I believe very strongly in you giving Chris your money.

Apr 22

quote Apologies to those for whom these Josh Lueke tweets interfere with their enjoyment of a game, but the threat of sexual assault interferes with how a vast majority of women enjoy life.

Apr 11
davepress:

Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman’s home on Remodelista, because I’m in a nesting phase..

Very lovely! That Sapien bookcase is the bomb dot see eh.

davepress:

Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman’s home on Remodelista, because I’m in a nesting phase..

Very lovely! That Sapien bookcase is the bomb dot see eh.

Apr 09

quote

Two and a half years ago, I ranted on Twitter about Superman and why it makes no sense for people to dislike him the way they do. My general feeling then was just that people had some sort of hard line aversion to identifying with someone who always tries to do the right thing, as though great power and great responsibility were peanut butter and arsenic. I mean, I get it. I used to think Captain America was weaksauce milquetoast and that he would be way cooler if he was more of an antihero. For context, however, when I thought this, my favorite filmmaker was Kevin Smith, my favorite band was Limp Bizkit, and I was a couple of years out from being really into Mark Millar. Luckily, time is less of a flat circle than Rustin Cohle would have you believe.

The point is, I grew up. I stopped being a world-hating boychild whose blood type was misplaced anger. I stopped conflating negative character traits with positive signifiers. One of the reasons people seem to criticize optimistic superheroes is because they aren’t realistic enough, but I think they’re missing the point. We created superheroes because we needed something “unrealistic” to save us. Realism is relative. The argument that a superhero who is a bit of a dick all the time is more real or interesting than one who is decent and upstanding all the time is complete bullshit. You know what’s boring? A lack of conflict.

In Defense of Supermen [Editorial] | Deadshirt (via bigredrobot)

So this is what it’s like when someone just dunks over a bunch of dummies and shatters the backboard, using only the power of their words!

Mar 02

Just now, I was talking with a friend about the Oscars, and some tweets by W. Kamau Bell in particular that were trying to raise awareness about Fruitvale Station, a really incredible movie from last year about the true story of a young black man shot and killed while cuffed and detained by BART police officers in Oakland.  It’s a powerful movie and I, like Bell, encourage you to see it.  Bell’s point is that while another movie about the black experience in America, 12 Years a Slave, is good, it risks furthering the narrative that racism in the US is “over,” that it’s something that we’ve dealt with and can move past now.  Fruitvale Station, on the other hand, is about the ways racism is still real and cuts young, vibrant lives short now.  Again, go see it, because it’s one of the best movies I’ve seen in a long time.

But thinking about the ways that racism and other prejudices still exist but do so more insidiously, I started thinking and talking about something that happened to me this week.  I was in my condo building’s elevator in the morning on my way to work, and in stepped a friendly acquaintance of mine in the building.  She was on her way to a billiards tournament at the River Cree Casino, a casino on a First Nations reserve just out of town, and complaining about the early hours, so I just mentioned, offhand, “Well, at least they’re probably going to provide coffee, at least,” because I dunno, I assumed maybe they might?  I don’t know how casinos operate, but sometimes conferences provide free coffee to me.

"No, nothing’s covered," she told me.  "Their land, their water, so we have to pay, you know?"  She spat out second sentence in a way I’ve heard a lot of times in my life, the way that non-aboriginal people do when they’re saying aboriginal people are greedy and should just let the past go, sheesh, already.

I didn’t know what to do.  I froze.  Should I call her on it?  Should I say that’s not cool, that I’m aboriginal, that her sentence was a little hurtful?  We weren’t the only two people in the elevator (!), and not only did I not want to cause a scene, I didn’t know how the other person felt.  Was he silent because he didn’t want to make a scene either, or because he agreed?  I’m often surprised by the kind of people who have these ideas, like my friend in Grade 10 social studies class who said aboriginal people shouldn’t get any aid or funding because they don’t have jobs and will just spend it on booze and cigarettes.  I didn’t say anything then, either, because it’s hard to stand up in a room full of 29 friends and ask one of them to kindly not be racist, but I eventually talked to the teacher about it and things more or less got sorted out.

I couldn’t really complain to anyone here, though, and I’m not 16 anymore, either.  I should be able to fight my own fights, right?  But I still didn’t know what to say, so I just shrugged, looked away, and didn’t say anything.

I wish I’d said something.  I’ve felt guilty about it all week.  In the moment, it’s easy to feel alone and afraid, but now I mostly just feel a little ashamed.  I should have said something, because as fucked up as it is that I hear all this stuff because I take after my dad’s colouring as a light-skinned Metis man, and not my mom’s very dark skin, it makes me wonder about how people treat her, or the kind of things they might say about her when she can’t hear.  What would they tell me about her if they didn’t know I was her son?  What would this person have said to me if I looked like my mom?  Why don’t I think about this more often?  Why don’t I think about my mom’s experience more often?  Am I a bad son for not thinking about it more often?  I feel like I let her, my dad, my entire family, down, in a dumb way.

I should have said something.